The Really WILD Food Guide

Eating Hawthorn & Hogweed


Hawthorn & Potato     AROMATIC POTATOES & HAWTHORN

Young spring hawthorn leaves cooked with potato and onions flavoured with cumin, turmeric and cardamom pods.


WARNING:
CONSUMING HAWTHORN COULD BE DANGEROUS
FOR PEOPLE WITH CARDIAC AND CIRCULATORY DISORDERS.

 

Hogweed Bubble and Squeak

 

HOGWEED BUBBLE & SQUEAK

Lightly boiled and chopped spring hogweed leaves mixed with mashed potato and corned beef, then shallow fried.

NOTE: This is the normal hogweed - Heracleum sphondylium - NOT the Giant Hogweed which should certainly not be consumed and preferably not handled.

WARNING:
IN CERTAIN PEOPLE HANDLING HOGWEED CAN CAUSE SERIOUS SKIN BLISTERING, PARTICULARLY
IN STRONG SUNLIGHT. PROCEED WITH CARE.

 

Cooked Hogweed Shoots

 

STEAMED HOGWEED SHOOTS

Spring shoots of hogweed stripped of their soft bristly covering [apart from the leaf top], then steamed for about 15 mins. with sliced spring onion, juice from some grated ginger root and a dribble of olive oil. The author prefers not to eat the leaf tops which are a bit woolly.

Again, this is Heracleum sphondylium and not Giant Hogweed.

WARNING:
IN CERTAIN PEOPLE HANDLING HOGWEED CAN CAUSE SERIOUS SKIN BLISTERING, PARTICULARLY
IN STRONG SUNLIGHT. PROCEED WITH CARE.

For your safety. Do not consume wild plants if you have
ANY medical condition, during pregnancy, or give to minors.

RECIPES PAGE 7 | WILD FOOD HOMEPAGE | RECIPES PAGE 9


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